The Monarch butterfly will take you to the Top of the Page!
(What's on this website.)
Learn about Fourpeaks? CLICK HERE to start.
Explore Fourpeaks 700-acre private Vacation/Getaway!
Learn about Fourpeaks? CLICK HERE to start.
  • Meet Your Host
  • 7 Backcountry Cabins
  • 4-Season Activities
  • Private hiking trails
  • Romantic getaway?
  • Pet-friendly vacation
  • Meet Our Guests!
  • Rental Rates/Prices
  • AvailabilityCalendar
    CLICK for a prompt detailed response to your vacation Inquiry.E-Z Inquiry Form
  • Email Us
  • Phone our Help Desk
  • Join our Mailing List
  • Maps & Directions
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Safety First!  and Guest Information
  • Adirondack Photos
  • Adirondack Poetry
  • An Adirondack Miscellany
  • Personal Potpourri
  • The Fourpeaks Story 1968-present
  • Select Link Pages
  • Your Adirondack Vacation: What's New!What's New!
  • Please WAIT! Then SCROLL DOWN for an Adirondack Letter.    [ Are you in this picture? ]

    Hints of Balsam and Pine  from our  corner of the Adirondacks. Adirondack Letters
    No.29: A Pine Story.   I live in giant pine, tall and strong with thrifty tops that tower eighty feet. CLICK for map. Look for Camp Barn, at the foot of Bassett Mountain, not far from The Cabin.
    CLICK & GO!  (On this page.)   Adirondack Letter No.29: "A Pine Story."    More stuff in An Adirondack Miscellany.   (On the next page.)   Links to all the Adirondack Letters in this series.

    [Click on thumbnail for full view. Scroll Down for more photos.]
    00894_orig.jpg
    Matute cones, late fall.
    02750_orig.jpg
    Pines together.
    12614_orig.jpg
    Stout trunk up to 24 inches.
    34580_orig.jpg
    Lone pine.
    88723_orig.jpg
    Young pine.
    Subject: A Pine Story.
    Date: Wed, 19 June 2013 20:09:13
    From: Martin (Your Adirondack Guide)
    To:    Fourpeaks Visitors
    At:    < youremailname@youremail.address >

    Dear Fourpeaks Visitor,

    When I first got here exploring the hundreds of acres that fell to
    me almost the first thing I learned--trees have value. Bill
    Lincoln explained it to me. Building a modern well fourteen feet
    down with 3-foot concrete sections and crushed stone at the bottom
    by the spring run where Jim Melvin had his tent platform after the
    war. Getting down from the machine, "Would you like to harvest
    trees for cash." Something to that effect or maybe he said
    nothing. Bill is a true local a person of few words.

    He took me for a walk that day every so often pointing out a
    mature pine. "Ripe for harvesting. A hundred dollar tree by the
    looks of it." Whatever arrangement I made with him I remember only
    telling him not to cut anywhere close to the cabin. Weeks later at
    the office his bill for the new well showed a modest credit for
    "Pine."

    With a growing passion for tree gardening I set Merritt to work on
    the open 4-acre flat nearby, almost pure eastern with a high
    crown, cutting out whatever hardwood there was along with fallen
    debris and cleaning the old stone wall that ran along one side. At
    work there on the weekend Danny the savvy realestate broker cum
    advisor admired and pronounced it good site improvement.

    Right at my backyard a dark low land filled with water off Bassett
    extended westerly a good distance. At the far end a stand of pure
    white birch at that time and a crude dam that held water for cows.
    I named it Indian Spring a reminder of what settlers here were up
    against and what they did about it. Walking often the small creek
    close by the path it made downhill with many turns, in deep woods
    a small hump rose up perfect for sitting. Maggie and Silas come
    spring clean for me one day and Billy builds a bridge over the
    flowing water. I set my Camp Barn outhouse on the edge of it, call
    it Pine Swamp.

    With good resin and an airy cellular structure, white pine is
    light and strong the perfect building material for the camps from
    Wolf's Nest right on to Ridge in the seventies and Thoreau and
    Gypsy later. Shirley Wallace rough cuts it at his mill on Valley
    Road. A full 2x4 for wall studs, 2x8 or better for joists and
    rafters, and stout one-inch boards for walls siding and the rest.
    I hire his son Bobby for building but the shelves cabinets and
    decoration I do my own on weekends. The Hut at First View is
    roofed and wrapped ready for siding and windows this summer. May
    be my last.

    Cody comes by the other day and George the camp watchdog takes no
    notice. He's had to walk in and takes me outside to show me a dead
    twelve inch pine across the road. We get the saw and I ask him to
    cut at road's edge. Leave the stump where it fell. Fallen trees
    have a story to tell I say, thinking of the good size stumps I've
    found around over the years, none of them very far from the road.

    I live in giant pine, tall and strong with thrifty tops that tower
    eighty feet. A pure stand of them. Come see for yourself. Take the
    time to view life in its non-human, non-animal forms. You may
    discover a consonance that is healthy and comforting beyond words.
    If you hurry you'll make it in time for abundant meadow flowers in
    sun and open woods dark with a full canopy.

    JUST CLICK http://4peaks.com/finquiry.htm to get a no-obligation
    free detailed rental offer well suited to the season, your
    personal interests and budget. I'd like to help make the natural
    beauty of the Adirondack backcountry a part of your vacation
    experience.

               Your Adirondack Guide,

               Martin Schwalbaum

             Member Whiteface Mountain Visitors Bureau           
          Member Lake Placid/Essex County Visitors Bureau

    ******************************************************************
    This is #29 of a really occasional newsletter, for Fourpeaks
    guests or anyone who ever inquired about a Fourpeaks Getaway.
    For more about my pine CLICK http://4peaks.com/fpswal.htm TO STAY ON the list remember to send me your new email.
    TO GET OFF send this letter back (reply) with "REMOVE" as subject.
    ******************************************************************
    Get on our mailing list. CLICK HERE  (Easy Form.) to get on our mailing list
    And receive occasional Adirondack Letters like this.



    3birch_01.jpg
    Fourpeaks guests at Cookout Hill, Whiteface Mtn View.
    3birch_02.jpg
    AuSable River and High Peaks View.
    3birch_03.jpg
    Bro-law,Sis, Dad on an Adirondack Adventure.
    3birch_04.jpg
    Leaf.
    3birch_05.jpg
    Spring top.


    Verbatim email exchanges with guests and prospective guests. Verbatim email exchanges with guests and prospective guests.CLICK HERE for more Fourpeaks Email Exchanges. Verbatim email exchanges with guests and prospective guests. Many of them informative. All of them good clean fun, even those about very serious subjects. Great if you like to read other people's mail.

    The Hunter's Shanty in the Adirondacks. Currier and Ives litho, 1861. CLICK HERE for An Adirondack Miscellany.An Adirondack Miscellany   Newspaper and Magazine articles, Books and lots more.  
    Ice storm of the Century Devastates Northcountry.January 1998
    Town of Jay Happy 200th Birthday Party at the 1829 Southmayd Stone House May 1998
    Natives and Outsiders at the Jay Old Covered Bridge. June 1998
    Jane McCrae Murdered by Indians in Ft. Edward NY. July 1777
    Adirondack Great Camps: Adventures in the Wilderness.
    Miss P, the famous www.Internet web purrcat, interviews Tramp, our Fourpeaks barking cocker.  
    Ironman USA comes to Fourpeaks.  
    Chickadees In Winter   
    Flying Critters on your Adirondack Vacation.
    Adirondack Letters: "Hints of Balsam and Pine from our corner of the Adirondacks."
    AuSable River Swimming: Where the Pools Are Never Crowded, And Water Slides Are Nature's Own (New York Times)
    A new novel about Fourpeaks: Moss Krupnick's Daughters of Utopia, 196 pages, $9.98
    For your Adirondack experience--"Stay Awhile In Style!" Plattsburgh-Republican November 2002.
    NATURE WITHIN REACH: Luxury Camping. (July 2004, Southwest Airlines SPIRIT (In-flight Magazine.)
    Annual Jay Yard Sale. (First Sale August 19, 2006.)
    Glamping. (Glamorous Camping.) (Jan-Feb, Nov-Dec 2008, Women's Adventure Magazine.)
    "Imagine a place that preserves the charm of the nineteenth-century back-country dwellings . . ." ADIRONDACK LIFE, 2006 Collectors Issue.

    .Are you in this picture? CLICK HERE to find out. 
    Are you in this picture? Fourpeaks hosts now welcome paying guests to a 700-acre rest and playground for vacations in the Adirondack Great Camp tradition. Couples appreciate Fourpeaks secluded settings. Outdoor loving families have fun exploring our accessible wilderness. Folks with dogs enjoy the open spaces to run their pets. A private nature rereat. For a vacation away from it all.    Are you in this picture?  CLICK HERE to find out!    [More about this at Frequently Asked Questions.]

  • CLICK for a prompt detailed response to your vacation Inquiry. Inquire about a Fourpeaks Adirondack Vacation/Getaway.   (Easy Inquiry Form.)
  • Email us  with questions or feedback.  Email us with questions or feedback. (Easy Email form.)
  • Phone our Help Desk with Phone help is just a moment away. Tollfree  or Cell phone contact any time. Cell phone contact any time.
  • No time for Fourpeaks right now? Frown!
    'Hints of Balsam and Pine from Our Corner of the Adirondacks.' Keep up with us through occasional newsletters. CLICK for sample.
    "Hints of Balsam and Pine from our Corner of the Adirondacks"
    Join our mailing list!  (Easy form.)
    Get on our mailing list. Join Our Fourpeaks List!
    Please Rate Our Fourpeaks Website. Please Rate Our Fourpeaks Website.Please Rate Our Fourpeaks Website. Whether you're an experienced webmaster or just a novice surfer, you may have feedback or suggestions to help us improve. We well remember the visitor who complained about the unpleasant glare from the HTML default royal blue links. That lead us to entirely revamp our background and link colors, making them softer, more eye pleasing. And the Florida expert who warned us about frustrating visitors with blind links. We followed his advice and now carefully identify links so visitors know before they "click" exactly where they're clicking to. Your comments or suggestions will be equally appreciated. 
    NOTE: If you got here via one of our many subsidiary information pages,  CLICK HERE to get the best view-- from our concise "Home Page." Thanks.  
    [CLICK HERE for easy email form to make your feedback/suggestions.]